FDA Wants Until 2076 to Fully Release Pfizer’s CCP Virus “Vaccine” Data: Lawsuit

Despite promises of full transparency to the public, the Food and Drug Administration has requested that a federal judge permit the organization to wait until 2076 to release information related to the licensing of Pfizer’s Chinese Communist Party (CCP) Virus “vaccine.”

In September, a group of over 30 top scientists and professors from various universities filed suit in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas. These scientists come from prestigious institutions such as Yale, Harvard, Brown, and UCLA.

These professionals reasoned that releasing the information would encourage the members of the vaccine resistant public to change their minds and become vaccinated. The group wanted to increase public confidence that the Pfizer vaccine was both safe and effective.

In 1967, the Freedom of Information Act was enacted to force federal agencies to operate with greater transparency. This act requires government bodies to respond to requests for information within 20 days.

However, a loophole in the act states that sometimes the time that is taken to actually release the information may vary “depending on the complexity of the request and any backlog of requests already pending at the agency,” according to the Freedom of Information Act website.

Attorneys representing the Food and Drug Administration in this case say that the amount of information requested is too great to quickly be released. This information amounts to over 300,000 pages and the FDA cannot quickly release the pages.

The lawyers for the defense say that all of this information must be reviewed before release to the general public because it may contain private business and trade secrets of the companies involved. This confidential information must be thoroughly reviewed, and the confidential parts have to be redacted to protect both the business practices of Pfizer-Biotech as well as the privacy of the individuals involved in the clinical trials.

Food and Drug Administration lawyers propose releasing as little as 500 pages per month of this information. They say that the department of the administration that handles such request is understaffed, having only 10 employees to process this information. Additionally, the Food and Drug Administration employees are busy processing about 400 additional Freedom of Information Act requests.

Attorneys for the FDA say that, in the past, releasing 500 page increments has been acceptable for other Freedom of Information Act requests. They say that they are not asking for anything unusual, since precedent has already been set.

The plaintiff’s attorneys responded that the information should be released no later than March 3, 2022. The plaintiffs believe that the importance of their request should be top priority and the 108-day window should be adequate.

“This 108-day period is the same amount of time it took the FDA to review the responsive documents for the far more intricate task of licensing Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine,” wrote Aaron Siri and John Howie, attorneys for the plaintiffs.

They added, “The entire purpose of the FOIA is to assure government transparency. It is difficult to imagine a greater need for transparency than immediate disclosure of the documents relied upon by the FDA to license a product that is now being mandated to over 100 million Americans under penalty of losing their careers, their income, their military service status, and far worse.”

The plaintiffs also add that under the FDA’s own regulations, the FDA is supposed to immediately make documents available when a vaccine is licensed. They believe that the paperwork related to the Pfizer/Biotech vaccine should already be in the process of preparation for release.

To meet the deadline proposed by the plaintiff, the FDA would have to prepare and release 80,000 pages every month. The plaintiffs point to the 18,000 employees and $6 billion budget of the federal agency to prove that this goal is, in fact, attainable.

Plaintiffs want the general public to be able to have access to the documentation detailing the approval process. Siri and Howe, attorneys for the plaintiff said, “Reviewing this information will settle the ongoing public debate regarding the adequacy of the FDA’s review process.”

On December 14, U.S, District Judge Mark Pittman set up a scheduling conference to reconsider the timeline for document release.

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